For Mohammed, Dialysis Needs Don’t End After Syria

“Back in the day, we had an amazing life, a wonderful life, we had everything we wished. I used to be a productive part of society. I worked as a human resources manager. My kids were in a good school, and my eldest was studying to be an engineer. Poof, and just like that everything we had, we wanted, we cherished vanished to dust.”

When the word “Syria” is mentioned, our heartstrings should tighten with concern and pain, causing our hands to act and help.

A Blemish on the World’s Conscience

It’s no secret that the devastating war in Syria continues to tarnish innocent lives, in addition to the countless lives it has already claimed or affected.

By the millions, Syrian refugees who are displaced from their homeland are seeking new places to call home, after fleeing out of fear or desperation.

The crisis has placed significant strain on the financial infrastructures of neighboring countries. Over the past eight years of war in Syria, Jordan welcomed more than 662,010 registered Syrian refugees, and many more unregistered refugees.

One of the most impacted sectors is healthcare. The overall wellbeing and health of the Syria people has been dramatically impacted by monumental emotional, mental, and physical pain.

For Mohammed, Dialysis After Syria

To gain just a momentary glimpse of what some of that may feel like, we need to look no further than the heart-stopping words of Mohammad Al Halabi, age 63, who was supported by one of Islamic Relief USA’s projects.

“Back in the day, we had an amazing life, a wonderful life, we had everything we wished. I used to be a productive part of society, I worked as a human resources manager. My family and I were lavished with life. My kids were in a good school, and my eldest was studying to be an engineer. Poof, and just like that everything we had, we wanted, we cherished vanished to dust.”

Mohammad’s family is now living in a small house in Madaba. The limited cash assistance that the family receives is barely enough to cover their essential needs.

“Our lives, including many others, were in danger every day. For two years I have was afraid, not for my life, but for the life of my family my children, my wife.

You know, life was unbearable. It was dangerous. It was volatile. We were all frightened…the thought of losing a loved one is something else. Something of sorrow and pain.

With the increase of airstrikes in our area we escaped, for a better life, for a better future for my kids.”

Mohammad is one of thousands who fled the fighting in Syria six years ago. The laborious journey to Jordan left him in deteriorating health condition.

On top of all he has coped with, Mohammed also suffers from kidney failure, and requires semi-daily dialysis sessions and specialized medication in order to stay alive.

“Three years ago I felt the walls closing on me: I was diagnosed with acute kidney failure, because a medical team didn’t know what they were doing. I found myself needing three dialysis sessions per week, just to stay alive.

My life began well and it spiraled downwards throughout the war and finally, it has hit rock bottom at that moment. How am I going to afford this? I barely afford the essentials just to keep living. My son works all day just to pay for the house that we live in.”

Islamic Relief works to alleviate the suffering of Syria refugees who struggle to cover the costs of hemodialysis. By providing funding to contracted hospitals in 2018-2019, Islamic Relief USA was able to work with the Islamic Relief Jordan team to select 14 patients with the highest need.

Mohammad was one of the selected patients. He has started to receive the dialysis sessions he needs, as well as all regular tests.

This relief is only possible through the generous donations of donors like you.

“Alhamdulillah. I know I am in bad shape, but I want to spend more time with my children—a peaceful time. I want to see them thrive in their new life. I want to see them rebuild their hopes and dream. I will do my best to help them rebuild their lives.

All of this might happen because you helped me.

I want to thank the donors for their support. I am sure Allah will reward them for their good deeds. I don’t have enough words to thank them.

Without your support, my health condition will be out of control. You covered the cost of everything, even the transportation fees. I hope this project continues. We crucially need your constant help.

You give hope to the patients and their families.”

And you, Mohammad, give hope to all of us.

Give to Syrian refugees like Mohammad now.

Article written by:

Kelly is part of the Communications & External Relations team at Islamic Relief USA.

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